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W

indquest

S

eries

76

E

nergy

P

erformance

T

erminology

U-Factor

refers to a measure of heat transfer through the

window or door unit. A lower U-factor means less heat

escapes during winter weather, thus reducing heating

costs in cold climates.

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC)

is a measure of

how much solar energy is passing through the unit’s glass.

The lower a window or door unit’s SHGC, the less solar

heat is transmitted into a room, thus allowing for lower

cooling bills in hot climates.

Visible Transmittance (VT)

is a measure of the portion

of visible light that passes through a window or door. The

higher a window or door unit’s VT Total, the more visible

light is transmitted into a room. This value is influenced

by both the glass selection and by the ratio of glazing and

frame area.

Condensation Resistance (CR)

measures the ability

to resist the formation of condensation on the interior

surface of that product. The higher the CR rating, the

better that product is at resisting condensation formation.

While this rating cannot predict condensation, it can

provide a credible method of comparing the potential of

various products for condensation formation.

E

n e r g y

P

e r f o r m a n c e

D

ata

Energy Star

®

U

nited

S

tate

s

Energy Star is a government-

regulated program that was created

by

the

Environmental

Protection

Agency

(EPA)

and

the

U.S.

Department of Energy (DOE), to help

consumers quickly and easily identify

energy saving products. The Energy

Star program uses energy values obtained by window and

door manufacturers through the National Fenestration Rating

Council (NFRC) program. NFRC ratings are based on the

energy performance of the total window or door – both glass

and frame.

The Energy Star program for the United States divides

the nation into four separate climate zones – Northern,

North-Central, South-Central, and Southern.

The performance criteria that needs to be met in order to

be Energy Star

compliant in a specific climate zone

(effective January 4, 2010) is shown in the charts provided

below.

Kolbe demonstrates a commitment to providing accurate energy data by having products independently simulated, tested,

inspected and listed in the NFRC certification program, and making that data available on our website and window labels.

Northern

Mostly Heating

North-Central

Heating & Cooling

South-Central

Heating & Cooling

Southern

Mostly Cooling

Northern

Mostly Heating

North-Central

Heating & Cooling

South-Central

Heating & Cooling

Southern

Mostly Cooling

Zone A

Southwestern Canada/

British Columbia

Zone B

Southern Canada

Zone C

Central Canada

Zone D

Northern Canada

Northern

Mostly Heating

North-Central

Heating & Cooling

South-Central

Heating & Cooling

Southern

Mostly Cooling

2010 ENERGY STAR Qualification Criteria for Doors

Criteria shown applies to both sliding and hinged doors and in all four climate zones.

Glazing

U-Factor

SHGC

Opaque

< 0.21

No rating

< 1/2-Lite

< 0.27

< 0.30

> 1/2-Lite

< 0.32

< 0.30

2010 ENERGY STAR Qualification Criteria for Windows

**

Northern zone windows can meet prescriptive (1st row) or alternative energy

performance (2nd & 3rd row) criteria to qualify for ENERGY STAR.

Climate Zones - U.S.

U-Factor

SHGC

Northern**

< 0.30

Any

Northern

= 0.31

> 0.35

Northern

= 0.32

> 0.40

North-Central

< 0.32

< 0.40

South-Central

< 0.35

< 0.30

Southern

< 0.60

< 0.27

NOTE:

Energy performance data and air, water, structural data is updated on a continuous basis. For the most

current information, visit

www.kolbe-kolbe.com

or contact your local Kolbe dealer.